5 Examples of Headless CMS Integrations

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by Brian Cooney | Last Updated: Aug 1, 2022

A content management system (CMS) is a software application or set of related programs that are used to create and manage digital content. A CMS may serve as a central repository containing documents, images, and other files that are used on a website or in a mobile app. CMSs can also be used to store, manage, and publish blog posts, news articles, and other forms of content.

Integrating a CMS with other software applications can enable users to seamlessly share content between them. For example, a CMS might be integrated with a customer relationship management (CRM) system so that customer service representatives can quickly access relevant information about a customer when they contact them. Similarly, a CMS might be integrated with a marketing automation system to help content marketers more easily track the performance of their content and make changes accordingly.

There are many different CMSs available, and each one offers different features and capabilities. Selecting the right CMS for your needs is an important decision that will have a significant impact on the success of your digital content strategy. When considering which CMS to use, be sure to consider the following factors:

Once you've selected a CMS, there are a few different ways to integrate it with other software applications. The most common approach is to use an application programming interface (API). APIs allow different software applications to communicate with each other and exchange data. Many CMSs provide APIs that allow developers to easily integrate the CMS with other applications.

Another option for integrating a CMS with other software is to use webhooks. Webhooks are essentially event-based notifications that are sent from one application to another when certain events occur. For example, a CMS might send a webhook notification to a CRM system whenever a new piece of content is published. This would allow the CRM system to automatically add the new content to its database and make it available to customer service representatives. For simplicity’s sake just think of webhooks as reverse APIs. 

Whether you use an API or webhooks, integration can help you more easily manage your digital content and get the most out of your CMS.

Examples of Headless CMS Integrations

1. WordPress

WordPress is a popular content management system (CMS) that enables you to create a website or blog from scratch, or to improve an existing website. It's been around for over a decade and is used by millions of people worldwide.

One of the reasons WordPress is so popular is because it's relatively easy to use and extremely versatile. You can find themes and plugins for just about anything you can think of, and if you're not a developer yourself, there's usually someone who can help you out.

Lately, there's been a lot of talk about using WordPress as a headless CMS. In case you're not familiar with the term, a headless CMS is one that doesn't have a front-end, or GUI (graphical user interface). In other words, it's a CMS that is used solely for managing content, and the front-end is built separately.

There are a number of advantages to using a headless CMS. For one thing, it can make your website faster and more scalable. It can also give you more control over the design and development process, as well as making it easier to integrate with other systems.

2. Drupal

Drupal is another popular content management system that has been around for over a decade. It's used by millions of people worldwide and is known for its flexibility and power.

Like WordPress, Drupal can be used as a traditional CMS with a front-end GUI, or as a headless CMS. In fact, Drupal was one of the first CMSs to be used in this way.

There are a number of advantages to using Drupal as a headless CMS. For one thing, it's extremely powerful and flexible. You can use it to build just about anything you can imagine, and if you're not a developer yourself, there's usually someone who can help you out.

Another advantage of using Drupal as a headless CMS is that it's easy to integrate with other systems. This can be extremely helpful if you're building a complex website or application that needs to interface with other software.

3. Joomla

Joomla is another popular content management system that has been around for over a decade. It's used by millions of people worldwide and is known for its ease of use and flexibility.

Like WordPress and Drupal, Joomla can be used as a traditional CMS with a front-end GUI, or as a headless CMS.

There are several advantages to using Joomla as a headless CMS. For one thing, it's relatively easy to use, even if you're not a developer yourself. There are also a lot of free and paid plugins and extensions available, which can help you add just about any functionality you need.

4. Magento

Magento is an eCommerce platform that enables you to create an online store from scratch or to improve an existing website. It's been around for over a decade and is used by millions of people worldwide.

Another advantage of using Magento as a headless CMS is that it's easy to integrate with other systems. This can be extremely helpful if you're building a complex website or application that needs to interface with other software.

5. Lumavate

Lumavate is a different type of example when it comes to integrations with Headless CMS. It is a digital experience platform which means that it has CMS capabilities or it can be used as a front-end for whichever CMS you use. Lumavate’s main focus is on creating digital experiences for customers or employees. The platform is no-code so it can be used by those with no previous coding experience.

If you have any questions about the options above or want to learn more about Lumavate's digital experience platform, book a demo today!

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